my latest syllabus: “Public Intellectuals: Theory and Practice”

Several years ago, I introduced a class at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Communications and Journalism which was designed to encourage scholars in training to think more deeply about the public-facing dimensions of their work. I wanted to call the class, "How to Be a Public Intellectual," but this is a university, …

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Re-assembling the Assembly Line: Digital Labor Economies and Demands for an Ambient Workforce

Watch Mary Gray's talk at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society where she discusses her findings from a two-year collaborative study on crowdwork --“the process of taking tasks that would normally be delegated to an employee and distributing them to a large pool of online workers, the ‘crowd,’ in the form of an open call." In …

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The paradox of automation’s “last mile”

My collaborator, Siddharth Suri, and I have spent nearly 2 years studying a nascent but rapidly expanding piece of the platform economy that we call “crowdwork.” Right now, crowdwork — millions of people around the world working in concert with programmers issuing tasks to an API — fuels automation of the internet. This work requires people to contribute responses, …

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My First Year On The Rural Side of the Digital Divide

This post originally appeared on Cyborgology as part of its "Small Town Internet" issue. Since I was thinking about several SMC members' research while writing this, and worked on this post while co-writing with Jessa Lingel, I thought it apropos to post it here as well. There's a lot more to be said about rural …

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“Critical algorithm studies” reading list

Nick Seaver and I have put together a list we wanted to share. It is an attempt to collect and categorize a growing critical literature on algorithms as social concerns. The work spans sociology, anthropology, science and technology studies, geography, communication, media studies, and legal studies, among others. Our aim was to catalog the emergence of “algorithms” as …

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Platformation: Greetings from the future of work!

On September 9, 2015, the Data & Society Research Institute hosted Platformation, a one-day summit that brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss platform economies and the labor that fuels them. Participants included platform business leaders, researchers, labor organization representatives, policy experts, and those contributing labor to this growing sector. You can read the full …

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