FATE postdoctoral position opens at MSR NYC

Exciting news! The FATE group (Fairness, Accountability, Transparency, and Ethics) at Microsoft Research New York City (MSR NYC) is looking for a postdoctoral researcher to start in July, 2017. This one-year position is an ideal opportunity for an emerging scholar whose work focuses on the social impacts of machine learning and AI. Application deadline: April 3, 2017.

Postdoctoral researchers receive a competitive salary and benefits package, and are
eligible for relocation expenses. Candidates must have completed their PhD, including submission of their dissertation, prior to joining MSR NYC (i.e., PhD submitted and preferably conferred by July 2017). We encourage candidates with tenure-track job offers from other institutions to apply, provided they are able to defer their start date to accept our position.

Microsoft Research provides a vibrant multidisciplinary research environment, with an open publications policy and close links to top academic institutions around the world. Postdoctoral researcher positions provide emerging scholars with an opportunity to develop their research career and to interact with some of the top minds in the research community. Postdoctoral researchers define their own research agenda. Successful candidates will have a well-established research track record, evidenced by top-tier journal or conference publications, as well as a strong service record (e.g. participation on program committees, editorial boards, and advisory panels).

While each of the Microsoft Research labs has openings in a variety of different disciplines, this position with the FATE group at MSR NYC is specifically intended for researchers who are interested in challenges related to fairness, transparency, accountability, and ethics in machine learning and AI. The FATE group includes Kate Crawford, Hanna Wallach, and Solon Barocas, among others. For a sampling of recent publications see their respective websites.

We will consider candidates with a background in a technical field (such as machine learning, AI, or NLP) as well as candidates who study socio-technical questions in the fields of anthropology, media studies, sociology, science and technology studies, and related fields.

The ideal candidate should have a demonstrated interest in the social impacts of machine learning and AI, and be interested in working in a highly interdisciplinary environment that includes computer scientists, social scientists, critical humanists, and economists.

To apply, please submit an online application on the Microsoft Research Careers website: https://careers.research.microsoft.com/

In addition to your CV and names of three or more referees (including your dissertation advisor), please upload the following materials:

* Two journal/conference publications, articles, thesis chapters, or
   equivalent work samples (uploaded as two separate attachments).

* A research statement (maximum length three pages) that 1) outlines
your research agenda (~one page); 2) provides a description and,
if appropriate, a chapter outline of your dissertation (~one page);
3) offers an explanation of how your research agenda relates to
fairness, accountability, transparency, and ethics (~one page).

Please indicate that your location preference is “New York” and include “Kate Crawford” as the name of your Microsoft Research contact (you may include additional contacts as well). Note: if you do not do this, it is *very unlikely* that we will receive your application.

After you submit your application, a request for letters will be sent to your referees on your behalf. You may wish to alert your referees in advance so that they are ready to submit your letter by April 3, 2017. You can check the progress on individual letter requests by clicking the “status” tab within your application page.

Microsoft is committed to building a culturally diverse workforce and strongly encourages applications from women and minorities.

 

Introducing our SMC interns for summer 2017!

We get the sharpest, most impressive crop of applicants for ourSocial Media Collective internship, it is no easy task to turn away so many extremely promising PhD students. But it is a pleasure to introduce those we did select. (Keep in mind that we offer these internships every summer; if you will be an advanced graduate student in our field in the summer of 2018, keep an eye on this blog or for updates to this page for the next deadline.) For 2017, we are proud to have the following young scholars joining us:

At Microsoft Research New England

  Ysabel Gerrard is a PhD Candidate in the School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds. Her doctoral thesis examines teen drama fans’ negotiations of their (guilty) pleasures in an age of social media. In addition to her research and teaching, Ysabel is the Young Scholars’ Representative for ECREA’s Digital Culture and Communication section, and is currently co-organising the Data Power Conference 2017 (along with two others). She has published in the Journal of Communication Inquiry and has presented her work at numerous international conferences, such as ECREA (European Communication Research and Education Association) and Console-ing Passions. Ysabel will be investigating Instagram and Tumblr’s responses to public discourses about eating disorders.

 

Elena Maris is a PhD Candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research examines the ways media industries and audiences work to influence one another, with a focus on technological strategies and the roles of gender and sexuality. She also studies the ways identity is represented and experienced in popular culture, often writing about race, gender and sexuality in television, fandom and Hip-Hop. Her work has been published in Critical Studies in Media Communication and the European Journal of Cultural Studies.

 

At Microsoft Research New York City:

Aaron Shapiro is a PhD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. He also holds an M.A. in Anthropology and a Graduate Certificate in Urban Studies. Aaron previously worked as a field researcher and supervisor at NO/AIDS Task Force in New Orleans, conducting social research with communities at high risk for HIV. His current research addresses the cultural politics of urban data infrastructures, focusing on issues of surveillance and control, labor subjectivities, and design imaginaries. His work has been published in Nature, Space & CultureMedia, Culture & Society, and New Media & Society. He will be working on a study about bias in machine learning.