We’re in the Era of Creator Culture

Credit: Photo by Jenna Ueberberg From influencers, vloggers, live streamers, to “Wanghong” (網紅) in China, the past decade saw the emergence of “creator culture” where “commercializing and professionalizing native social media users” generate and circulate original content “in close interaction and engagement with their communities” [1]. These creators engage in content creation in pursuit of …

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Farewell!

This is my last week as a postdoc with the SMC, so I thought I’d write a little something to mark the occasion. It’s been a brilliant two years since completing my PhD, I’ve met some wonderful people and have managed to consolidate my research agenda into something vaguely coherent. During my time here, I …

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SMC internship for the spring: on platforms / news / communities / moderation

I’m thrilled that I get to seek an additional SMC intern this year, for the spring of 2022. This would be a 12-week paid internship, like our summer gig, but running approximately March-May. Please consider applying if you want to work with me on issues around social media platforms, news curation, user communities, toxicity, or …

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Call for Papers: JCMC Special Issue on Technology and the Future of Work!

Nancy Baym and SMC alum Ifeoma Ajunwa are guest editing a special issue of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication! They welcome submissions from the extended SMC network. See the call for papers below: JCMC Special Issue: Technology and the Future of Work Guest Editors:Nancy Baym, Microsoft Research  Ifeoma Ajunwa, University of North Carolina Nicole Ellison, …

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SMC goes to AoIR: talks to look out for

This year at the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR) 22nd annual meeting, current SMC members and alumnae have some fantastic papers around the 2021 theme: independence.  Everything is virtual this year, which means you have until December 15th to watch these incredible talks online! Registration is free for AoIR members – you can register here to be able to view the videos. And this …

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SMC goes to 4S: a list of panels to look out for

Given the overwhelming SMC presence at the 2021 Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) annual meeting, we thought we’d assemble a list of panels chaired by, organized by, and featuring SMC members and alums. Tune in on October 6th - 9th to hear a wide range of presentations on topics such as dead and dying platforms, “caring” for data, the sexual politics of the polygraph, “Green …

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new publication from Niall Docherty on “digital self-control”

SMC postdoc Niall Docherty has a new publication in the International Journal of Communication, 'Digital Self-Control and the Neoliberalization of Social Media Well-Being'. Check it out! Abstract: Popular debates surrounding social media well-being target individual habit as the locus of critique and change. This article argues that this constitutes a commitment to responsibilized constructs of …

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The rise of parallel chat in online meetings: how can we make the most of it?

Our SMC collaborators at Microsoft Research Cambridge (UK) have a new post on the Microsoft Research blog about parallel chat in online meetings. Enjoy! Find the original blog post here. By Advait Sarkar, Senior Researcher Sean Rintel, Principal Researcher I’ll put a link to that doc in the chat” “Sorry, my internet is terrible, I’ll …

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The fragmentation of (digital) well-being

The potential well-being costs of the pandemic are many and harsh. Financial well-being is said to be at risk due to shrinking employment opportunities; physical well-being due to stay-at-home orders; social well-being due to limited interactions with loved ones; digital well-being due to increased reliance on remote communication. The list goes on. Dividing up the …

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