SMC news: two new articles from Desmond Patton and his SafeLab team

We're thrilled that Desmond Patton, associate professor in the School of Social Work at Columbia University, is visiting us for the first half of 2020. He's a rare bird in our field, able both to explain the importance of cultural contexts in data science techniques to technical experts, and to do the important ethnographic work …

Continue reading SMC news: two new articles from Desmond Patton and his SafeLab team

kudos for upcoming SMC visitor Paul Dourish

Now that we have said goodbye to our most recent long-term visitor, Henry Jenkins, we can look ahead to our next, Paul Dourish. It's a fine time to do so, as he has just been awarded two honors that testify to his important contributions to the study of computation and society. His 1992 paper "Awareness and Coordination …

Continue reading kudos for upcoming SMC visitor Paul Dourish

my latest syllabus: “Public Intellectuals: Theory and Practice”

Several years ago, I introduced a class at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Communications and Journalism which was designed to encourage scholars in training to think more deeply about the public-facing dimensions of their work. I wanted to call the class, "How to Be a Public Intellectual," but this is a university, …

Continue reading my latest syllabus: “Public Intellectuals: Theory and Practice”

new essay from SMC visitor Tom Streeter, on the persistent fascination with Steve Jobs

SMC is excited to welcome Tom Streeter, who will be soon making occasional visits to our New England lab, beginning later this month. To mark his arrival, we wanted to highlight the essay he has just published in the International Journal of Communication: “Steve Jobs, Romantic Individualism, and the Desire for Good Capitalism.” (Borrowing from the summary …

Continue reading new essay from SMC visitor Tom Streeter, on the persistent fascination with Steve Jobs

Why Digital Inequality Scholarship Needs Ethnography

Digital inequality scholarship is well-intentioned. It debunks myths about digital media’s inherent egalitarianism and draws attention to the digital dimensions of social inequalities. Digital inequality scholars have shown, for example, that people with access to networked media use those technologies in different ways, some of which are thought to be more beneficial than others. They …

Continue reading Why Digital Inequality Scholarship Needs Ethnography